Community

16 Reasons to Shop Local Instead of Online

150 150 Pat Monacelli

by Christina R. Metcalf

There is nothing more convenient than whipping out your phone, typing in a URL (or opening an app), perusing offerings, and hitting a few buttons to buy something…anything…everything. We even get our groceries that way these days. But as convenient as online shopping seems, there are several reasons to shop local.

16 Reasons to Shop Local Instead of Online

In person is the way to go this Small Business Season. If you can suspend disbelief for a few minutes, we’ll explain why.

Our Favorite Reasons to Shop Local During Small Business Season
Yes, online shopping is convenient. You don’t have to change out of your PJs and it’s always open. But in the t-chart of holiday shopping options, there are a lot of reasons to shop local. Here are a few of our favorites:

You’re supporting your neighbors.

When you support Small Business Season and shop local, you are supporting your neighbors and they are more likely, in turn, to keep the money you spent with them local as well (for every $100 spent locally, $68 of it stays local).

You are able to get in-person advice.

Not sure of the right size, color, or other option? Maybe you want to buy something but don’t know what else you need to make that purchase complete (like buying a fishing rod without any hooks or lures). An in-person shopping experience can help you straighten out the choices. Small business owners offer complete information and suggestions and you can ask questions about those suggestions. Doing that via chat online can be cumbersome and delayed as they are answering questions from several other shoppers at the same time.

You know what you’re getting.

Have you ever ordered something online only to be disappointed when it arrives? Maybe it’s smaller than you thought or the color is just too much. Online images can be very hard to discern. (Remember that dress a few years back? What color was that any way?) If you don’t read the description carefully, your item may be smaller (or larger) than expected and may not include things you had assumed came with it. Even when you do read the description, some items are sized differently or have unexpected variations. Don’t even get us started on what happens then.


For every $100 spent locally, $68 of it stays local.

Local yields easier returns.

Even though you have a clear understanding of what you’re buying when you buy in person, sometimes you need to return your purchase. When you do, it’s easier to do it locally than to send something back to an online store. Between paying for shipping to going to the post office and insuring it, bringing it back to a local business is generally easier than online returns.

Satisfaction guaranteed.

If you’re not satisfied with what you purchased, but it’s not something you can bring back (like a service or a food item), you know how to get in touch with the local provider. Some online sellers make it impossible to speak to a human. Try arguing your point with AI that uses keywords and automated language responses. Talking to the local business owner is much easier and they may be able to suggest something that is more along the lines of what you’re looking for.

Local shopping becomes an experience.

Yes, online shopping is quick, but you also have no memory of doing it. This can lead to overbuying. How many times during the holiday do you come home to find a package on your door step and you can’t remember what you purchased? You’ll remember when you go out. Plus, when you shop in-person or local, you can invite friends, family, or just make a pleasurable outing for yourself. This creates appealing memories of a wonderful seasonal experience.

It brings on the holiday spirit.

When you are out among the sounds and smells of the holiday, it brightens your mood. Who doesn’t love sparkling lights, glitter, snow (real or fake), and all of the happy tunes of the season? It’s hard to get those same smiles shopping online.

You may miss the best things when you only go online.

When you shop online, you do a few searches for things you are looking for. You are less apt to stumble across the perfect gift or item because you are on a targeted mission and only see what the online store presents. When you’re shopping in person, there are a lot of serendipitous moments where something catches your eye and you walk out knowing you found a treasure.

You meet and interact with people.

When you shop in-person, you meet and interact with people. We have been sequestered long enough. There’s something to be said from those chance meetings that occur when walking around town. Who knows–you could meet your next business partner or a former friend. From the warm smile of the business owner to a suggestion, compliment, or affirmation you receive from a fellow shopper, there are many times when these sorts of introductions can be very helpful.

You’ll receive better reviews.

Sure, online reviews are helpful but so are reviews from people around you. Plus, people you meet in person who are commenting on what you’re buying have a personal connection. They are vouching for the item or dish face-to-face. If you have questions about what they’re saying, you can ask. Online reviews are one-sided with very little chance for follow-up from the original poster.

No worries about delivery this small business season when shopping local.

With ports backed up and short-staffing throughout the supply chain, there’s a lot of talk about potential delivery delays this holiday. If you shop in-person, you won’t need to worry about this.

In-person shopping is perfect for procrastinators.

Sure, there are some online mega retailers who can get an item to you same day depending on where you live, but most times–especially as we get closer to the actual holiday–your best bet for last-minute gifts is a local shop. If you’re a procrastinator, feel free to take this reason to shop local as permission. You’ll feel less stressed about waiting , plus you won’t be depending on someone else’s delivery schedule.

Displays help you visualize.

Store displays are better than “you might also like” options in online stores. After all, the online suggestions are based on the buying patterns of others or using products the online retailer links together. Store displays are created (and stores are arranged) to help you find what you need and want. Collections are curated with the shopper in mind. You may find a lot of treasurers browsing that way.

Window shopping can lead to ideas.

When you shop in-person around the holidays you’ll be treated to beautiful window and decoration displays. These could inspire your holiday home décor or help you figure out something for your hard-to-buy-for aunt. A display may also draw you into trying a new business that you hadn’t noticed before. There are so many serendipitous possibilities when shopping in-person this Small Business Season.

You could find your next job.

If you shop in-person, you’ll quickly realize how many businesses are hiring. Who knows. You might decide to work at your favorite shop over the holidays.

One’s couch has never been the setting for a Hallmark holiday movie but Main Street certainly has.

And we all love those movies, don’t we?

Small business season sign image
We aren’t telling you to never shop online again. Online shopping is simply too convenient and there are many times when you can get things delivered online faster than you are able to clear your schedule and shop in-person. There are also many local sellers that have an online presence so you can buy online and still “shop local.”

Still, there are several reasons to shop local, including the ability to spread some holiday cheer to your local businesses this Small Business Season.

Those business owners would just love to see your smiling face and the serious ones of Mr. Jackson, Hamilton, and Washington.

This Small Business Season, let’s give local and small businesses something to be thankful for.

Let’s give them the gift of our support.

APPLICATIONS BEING ACCEPTED FOR 2021-2022 LEADERSHIP BROOMFIELD

150 150 Pat Monacelli

The Broomfield Chamber of Commerce is now accepting applications for the 2021-2022 class of Leadership Broomfield.

The goal of Leadership Broomfield is to build a sense of community by identifying individuals with the passion and commitment to become personally engaged in issues, programs and activities aimed at building a better City and County of Broomfield.

The program is designed to help attendees:
• define and enhance leadership abilities
• connect with local leaders in a variety of areas
• be exposed to the challenges and opportunities that face the city and county
• determine how to become more involved in leadership roles in the community
• build lasting professional relationships with community leaders

Leadership Broomfield features six monthly sessions plus a December mixer, running from November 2021 to April 2022. Each session focuses on a different aspect of the community, including quality of life, the nonprofit community, local government, and much more.

The application deadline is October 29. To apply for Leadership Broomfield, fill out our online application form.

BUSINESS/RESTAURANT RE-OPENING RESOURCES

150 150 Pat Monacelli

The Broomfield Chamber has created some images and signage that we our offering to local businesses to utilize in their re-opening efforts, and in their efforts to communicate mask requirements. Please feel free to use these in social media, or print for your windows or store-fronts. If you need PDF versions of the posters, please reach out to patrick.monacelli@broomfieldchamber.com.

The City and County of Broomfield also has a Blueprint to Reopening plan, and a Business Support Toolkit. You can find those resources here.

Let’s work together to make our community’s return to business successful. We are in this together, and we are Broomfield Business Strong!


Mask requirement graphics: Formats include png, 8.5×11 PDF and 11×17 PDF

Restaurant mask requirement

Mask Required Poster-Restaurant-Bar

Mask Required Poster-Restaurant-Bar-11×17

 

Store/Business mask requirement

Mask Required Poster-Store-Business

Mask Required Poster-Store-Business-11×17

 

Business Reopening graphics: Available as PNG files for use in social media, or to print as signs

       

     

BROOMFIELD CHAMBER, COMMUNITY FOUNDATION LAUNCH BROOMFIELD SMALL BUSINESS FUND

150 150 Pat Monacelli

Collaborative fund aims to help businesses rebuild as they re-open.

The Broomfield Chamber of Commerce, in conjunction with the Broomfield Community Foundation, has created a new relief and assistance fund designed to help local small businesses recover from the COVID-19 pandemic closures and restrictions.

The Broomfield Small Business Fund will distribute cash grants to assist eligible small businesses that are or may have closed temporarily, are having financial difficulty paying business rent and utilities, and/or are facing staff reductions or cuts in hours due directly to COVID-19 related market impacts.

Apply for funding or donate to the fund here.

“Broomfield has long been a great place to start and grow your business. Our community is a strong supporter of small business and now many of them are at risk of permanently going out of business through no fault of their own,” Said Sam Taylor, President and CEO of the Broomfield Chamber. “This fund will offer a lifeline for those companies that need a little extra help as they reopen their companies after being shut down because of the pandemic.”

“The Broomfield Community Foundation is proud to support the Broomfield Chamber of Commerce and our local small businesses throughout the medium and long-term recovery period to get back on their feet. The Broomfield Small Business Fund provides an easy solution for local residents and corporate supporters to assist fellow Broomfield businesses in a much bigger way,” stated Marianna Williamson, Executive Director of the Broomfield Community Foundation, which will be managing the fund and distributing grants.

Businesses that receive grants can use funds on direct business expenses such as payroll, inventory, supplies, lease or rent payments for non-residential business premises, and utilities for non-residential business locations. Fund grants are intended to promote business success, resulting in employee retention, supplement business revenues for payment of expenses, and sustaining business activity in the City and County of Broomfield.

Contributions are still being accepted to help grow the fund. You can make an online contribution, or apply for funding here.  Questions can be directed to the Broomfield Chamber of Commerce at info@broomfieldchamber.com.

Statement on Extension of the Stay-At-Home Order for the City and Count of Broomfield

150 150 Pat Monacelli

By Sam Taylor
President and CEO, Broomfield Chamber of Commerce

Leadership is tough. Telling people what they want to hear and having them follow you is easy; people do it all the time. Real leadership is doing what you believe is right, even when it upsets people who believe their situation is not being considered. It takes fortitude and dedication to stick to stick to those decisions. This pandemic has provided us with a lot of opportunity for leadership. Some people have failed miserably, many have succeeded, but in such a small way we never hear about it. One thing is certain, we need to follow the leadership that is the best for all of us.

As the CEO of the Chamber of Commerce, I want nothing more than for our businesses to go back to how things were two months ago. Business was booming, the State of Colorado had money that they could add to transportation, our unemployment level was low, and you could stand next to someone and not worry about contracting a potentially deadly disease. Those days may come back, but today is not that day. Governor Polis came out with his Safer at Home plan this week and he wants things to go back to normal. The Governor has stressed that he understands that it is not going to happen overnight. He also recognized that each community is different and responds to isolation and preventative care differently. As such, he specifically called on each community to monitor and act in their best interests to prevent a second wave of COVID-19 worse than what we are going through now. The Broomfield City Council, led by Mayor Quinn, believe that based on our demographics and situation that slightly more caution is needed. They have decided to wait an additional couple of weeks.

Is this the best choice for our community? Based on the conversation, there are many residents and businesses that say yes and just as many that say no. We do need to get our businesses back in business as soon as possible. But if we do it too soon, we risk being worse off than we are now, as hard as that is to imagine. So, yes, we should certainly let the Mayor and our other elected officials know what we think, and how hard this is on our businesses and their employees. But let’s also give them the leeway to lead, to use solid data from the CDC and our own public health department in making their decisions. Let’s give our Mayor the right to lead as he was elected to do. True leadership is not easy, but it is critical in a time of crisis.

Sam Taylor
President/CEO

  • 1
  • 2